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  Paitent Education 

Why see a Pediatric Dentist?

Why are my child's permanent teeth coming in "yellower" than his/her baby teeth?

Why is my child's front tooth turning grey?

Why does my child have a tooth coming in behind the other?

Will my child need braces?

Does my child need fluoride supplements?

First Aid for Dental Emergencies

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth

Broken Tooth

Toothache

Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip, or Cheek

Possible Broken Jaw

Bleeding After a Baby Tooth Falls Out

Cold/Canker Sores

Loose or Broken Brackets & Wires


Why see a Pediatric Dentist?
Pediatric dentists are specialists with additional years of training. Along with specialized technical skills, they also posses a thorough understanding of the needs and development of each child. Pediatric dentists offer care for infants, children, adolescents and teenagers. They have also acquired specialized training in treating patients with special needs. Patient management is a large part of the dentist and his or her staffs expertise. In fact, it is perhaps the most important part of pediatric dentistry. With this expertise the hope is to help your child develop a positive outlook towards dentistry as well as form a bond of trust and acceptance with the doctor and his or her staff.
Early involvement beginning with infant dental healthcare, home care instruction and preventative procedures such as sealants, regular cleanings and fluoride applications ensure a happy and healthy smile. As you can see, by seeing a pediatric dentist, not only do you receive excellent dental care for your child, but your child also receives the gift of encouragement to maintain a beautiful smile for the future.
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Why are my child's permanent teeth coming in "yellower" than his/her baby teeth?
At approximately 6 to 7 years of age, parents begin to notice the new permanent teeth are coming in darker than the baby teeth. Our permanent teeth have a greater amount of dentin, which is yellow in color. Since the enamel is translucent, the color of the dentin shows through. When all the permanent teeth have erupted the color will blend and appear uniform.
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Why is my child's front tooth turning gray?
Many times, due to an injury, the nerve inside the tooth may be bruised or infected causing a grey discoloration. With time, usually within a month or so, the tooth may lighten up or even become darker. Anytime there is an injury to the mouth you need to have your child evaluated by a dentist.
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Why does my child have a tooth coming in behind the other?
If a child's mouth is overcrowded, a permanent tooth may not be directly underneath the baby tooth, therefore allowing the permanent tooth to erupt out of its natural alignment. It is wise to have your child evaluated by a dentist to determine whether or not the baby tooth needs to be removed to allow the permanent tooth to erupt in the best possible position.
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Will my child need braces?
Sometimes you are able to predict whether your child will need braces by simply looking at how crowded your child's baby teeth are. If your child's baby teeth are very close together then this can mean there will be some straightening of the permanent teeth needed in the future. The determining factor is the way in which your child's bites is. Usually by age 8 or 9 one is able to tell if a child will need braces.
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Does my child need fluoride supplements?
Fluoride supplementation is determined by the history of each child's fluoride intake. A child, who drinks plenty of water in a "Fluoridated Community" or Fluoridated bottled water, will not need a fluoride supplement. If you use a water filtration system or are considering the purchase of one, check to see if it filters out fluoride. If it does filter out fluoride your child may need a fluoride supplement. Fluoride assessments can be done by your child's pediatrician or pediatric dentist.
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First Aid for Dental Emergencies

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth
If your child knocks out a permanent tooth, locate the tooth, pick it up by the top of the tooth (crown portion). DO NOT attempt to wash it off or handle it unnecessarily. Preferably place tooth into a cup of milk, if unavailable, water will do. Then SEE YOUR DENTIST IMMEDIATELY! Timing is crucial in saving a tooth.
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Broken Tooth
Rinse the injured area with warm water to remove any dirt or debris. Place a cold compress on the injured area of the mouth. If possible save any tooth fragments found and see your dentist immediately.
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Toothache
A lot of times a toothache is caused by trapped food or debris. Make sure you clean around the affected area thoroughly. Use dental floss and rinse your mouth vigorously with a cup of warm saltwater. NEVER directly place aspirin on the gum or on the aching tooth. If your child's face appears to be swollen place a cold compress on the area. If your child is in pain, give him/her Children's Tylenol, Advil or Motrin and see your dentist as soon as possible.
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Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip, or Cheek
Apply ice to bruised areas. If child is bleeding, apply firm but gentle pressure with a clean gauze pad or cloth. After 15 minutes, if the bleeding is uncontrollable by simple pressure, take your child to a hospital emergency room.
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Possible Broken Jaw
If you suspect your child has a fractured jaw, try to keep the jaws from moving by using a towel, tie or handkerchief. Then take the child to the nearest hospital emergency room.
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Bleeding After a Baby Tooth Falls Out
Do not be alarmed, just pack a clean gauze pad or cloth in the bleeding area. Have your child bite on it for 15-20 minutes. Repeat if necessary. If bleeding persists after 3 applications, see your dentist.
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Cold/Canker Sores
Many children occasionally suffer from "cold" or "canker" sores. Usually the over-the-counter items such as (Orabase, Orajel) give the appropriate relief. Just apply it to the lesion a few times daily. Because some serious diseases may begin as sores, it is important to have a dentist evaluate these sores if they persist.
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Loose or Broken Brackets & Wires
If a broken appliance can be removed easily, take it out. If not, cover the sharp or protruding portion with dental wax or a gauze pad. If a wire is stuck in the gums, cheek or tongue, DO NOT ATTEMPT TO REMOVE IT. See your orthodontist or dentist immediately. Loose or broken appliances, which do not bother the child, do not usually require emergency attention.
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